Got Font?

"Got Font?"  The name of this quilt came from the fabric, most of which has wording, letters, and numbers on it.  I found it in a Jelly Roll a couple of years ago and haven't known what to do with it until I saw this pattern!

“Got Font?” The name of this quilt came from the fabric, most of which has wording, letters, and numbers on it. I found it in a Jelly Roll a couple of years ago and haven’t known what to do with it until I saw this pattern!


I am absolutely in love with Creative Grids rulers, especially these specialty rulers.  This pattern, "Teacups" by Jay Bird Quilts, uses 2 1/2" strips to create a tumbler quilt.  Julie from Jay Bird uses the Double-Strip Tumbler ruler in her pattern to cut the tumbler pieces, and I have to say, I really enjoyed using this technique.  (The pattern also includes a template if you don't want to use the ruler.)  If you don't already have 2 1/2" strips to work with, one side of the ruler is a 2 1/2" ruler, while the other side of the ruler cuts the tumblers.

I am absolutely in love with Creative Grids rulers, especially these specialty rulers. This pattern, “Teacups” by Jay Bird Quilts, uses 2 1/2″ strips to create a tumbler quilt. Julie from Jay Bird uses the Double-Strip Tumbler ruler in her pattern to cut the tumbler pieces, and I have to say, I really enjoyed using this technique. (The pattern also includes a template if you don’t want to use the ruler.) If you don’t already have 2 1/2″ strips to work with, one side of the ruler is a 2 1/2″ ruler, while the other side of the ruler cuts the tumblers.


The pattern begins with seaming sets of (2) 2 1/2" strips.  I chose to use as much contrast as I could in my strip sets, although I was working with neutrals, so this is not a high contrast quilt.  After seaming the strip sets and pressing them open, I used the Double-Strip Tumbler ruler to cut the tumblers.  I also used "background" tumblers made from Osnaburg fabric.  This gave the quilt an earthy, "organic" look and feel.

The pattern begins with seaming sets of (2) 2 1/2″ strips. I chose to use as much contrast as I could in my strip sets, although I was working with neutrals, so this is not a high contrast quilt. After seaming the strip sets and pressing them open, I used the Double-Strip Tumbler ruler to cut the tumblers. I also used “background” tumblers made from Osnaburg fabric. This gave the quilt an earthy, “organic” look and feel.


Here are the first couple of rows of tumblers sewn together.  The tumblers on the end are trimmed in order to square up the quilt.  The instructions in the pattern actually say to trim the excess from the ends after the whole quilt top has been pieced.  I find that too difficult, and prefer to cut the pieces to size as I go.

Here are the first couple of rows of tumblers sewn together. The tumblers on the end are trimmed in order to square up the quilt. The instructions in the pattern actually say to trim the excess from the ends after the whole quilt top has been pieced. I find that too difficult, and prefer to cut the pieces to size as I go.


Rows all laid out and ready to sew!

Rows all laid out and ready to sew!


All pieced together and quilted- a little swirl to balance all of those straight lines!

All pieced together and quilted- a little swirl to balance all of those straight lines!


I decided to try something new with this quilt.  Instead of using my normal sewing machine, I thought I would try to use my serger to attach the binding.  My serger has a perfect 1/4" seam, and of course, it trims as it goes.  (I do not trim all of the excess off before I sew on the binding.)  However, the corners were very complicated.  I will probably practice this idea a little more before sharing the details of how I got it done!

I decided to try something new with this quilt. Instead of using my normal sewing machine, I thought I would try to use my serger to attach the binding. My serger has a perfect 1/4″ seam, and of course, it trims as it goes. (I do not trim all of the excess off before I sew on the binding.) However, the corners were very complicated. I will probably practice this idea a little more before sharing the details of how I got it done!


I really do love finishing the binding by hand.  I know there are a lot of machine techniques out there, and I do use them from time to time, but I really love doing it by hand.  Crazy, huh?

I really do love finishing the binding by hand. I know there are a lot of machine techniques out there, and I do use them from time to time, but I really love doing it by hand.
Crazy, huh?


They don't look like much in this photo, but these are a clever pattern by Karen Montgomery.  The pattern is "Reversible Pillow Wrap", and it is an inexpensive one sheet pattern offered at a number of quilt shops.  The other side of these wraps are a totally different fabric that will match a totally different quilt- if I ever get the quilt made!  Check out the pillows in the first image on this post- that's what these babies turn out to be.

They don’t look like much in this photo, but these are a clever pattern by Karen Montgomery. The pattern is “Reversible Pillow Wrap”, and it is an inexpensive one sheet pattern offered at a number of quilt shops. The other side of these wraps are a totally different fabric that will match a totally different quilt- if I ever get the quilt made! Check out the pillows in the first image on this post- that’s what these babies turn out to be.


And here's the final quilt!  I wanted to frame it a little, but not all the way, so I added borders to the top and bottom.  I also didn't totally follow the directions when it cam to size, but I was mostly obedient to the instructions, so I feel like I didn't do too shabby!

And here’s the final quilt! I wanted to frame it a little, but not all the way, so I added borders to the top and bottom. I also didn’t totally follow the directions when it came to size, but I was mostly obedient to the instructions, so I feel like I didn’t do too shabby!


While this isn't the most helpful image to you if you were thinking about making this quilt, I love this shot because it really is a pretty cool perspective.  "Got Font?" belongs to one of my daughters, and she took this picture, which I thought was pretty creative.  Smart girl.

While this isn’t the most helpful image to you if you were thinking about making this quilt, I love this shot because it really is a pretty cool perspective. “Got Font?” belongs to one of my daughters, and she took this picture, which I thought was pretty creative. Smart girl.

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