Being a little Frank about things.

I love Frank Lloyd Wright’s work.  I don’t like to pick favorites because when I like something or someone, it is usually because of the unique aspects of that thing or person, and claiming favorites to me is like comparing apples to oranges.  Which do you like better?  Well, I don’t like one more than another because I like them for totally different reasons.

So, I don’t know that I would say he is my favorite, in part because I don’t have favorites, but also because I don’t know enough about art and architecture to make such a claim.  However, I would say that I love his work.  Everything I have ever seen by him I have loved.  Clean lines.  Simple design with bold impact.  Neat and tidy.  Exploding with beauty.  I just love it.

So, you could say his work inspires me.  I’ve wanted to do some quilting in his style for quite some time, but have never had a good excuse to try it.  Until I needed a birthday gift.  What better excuse than that?

It needed to be relatively small- 5″x7″ to be exact, so I knew this would present some challenges, but I was really excited about trying.

IMG_7115I thought the easiest way to do it would be foundation piecing, so I sketched out the idea I had on a piece of 8 1/2″ x 11″ piece of paper using the 1/4″ and 1/8″ markings on my Creative Grids rulers.  It took some planning to include seam allowances, and I wasn’t sure how it was going to work.  I’ve done improv foundation piecing before, but never one that I wanted to actually be precise.

IMG_7116Next I dug into my scrap bins.  I chose batiks for this project because I wanted the translucent look of stained glass.  Again, I had no idea how this was going to turn out but I just went for it.

I went about my work in the usual foundation piecing way- I cut my design into five sections that I would later sew together.  I started in the center of the larger piece, working my way to the outer edges and making sure I had at least 1/4″ hanging off of each side for piecing the two sections together and for putting into a frame.  Then on the four smaller pieces I started at one corner and worked to the other corner, alternating which directions my seams were going in for easier “nesting” when I sewed the sections together.

IMG_7125In the process of doing this, I learned something that I hadn’t known before regarding foundation piecing.  Because these lines were SO tiny, it was really important to try to get the seams as straight and correct as possible.  I didn’t accomplish this perfectly, but I think I will get better over time.  Anyway, I discovered that it was much easier to stay on the drawn lines of my pattern if I used an open toe foot instead of my usual quarter inch foot.  It allowed me to be able to see needle placement much better and I was able to stitch on the line much easier.  That open toe foot sure gets used a lot in my studio.  (Think of that last sentence as if you don’t know any sewing terms.  Oh boy.)

IMG_7120Overall I was pleased with the finished product, but I have to admit there were a few things I would do differently next time.  And there will be a next time.

IMG_7126Remember that neat little stack of batik scraps that I showed you earlier?  Yeah, if you are familiar with foundation piecing, you know how that pile looks after the fact…

IMG_7128Creative carnage.

 

3 thoughts on “Being a little Frank about things.

  1. I love your improv picture! I absolutely love and admire Frank Lloyd Wright’s work (what I’ve seen of it) and my current quilt/wall hanging is based on a photograph of one of his buildings.

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